Introducing RichCopy – your Robocopy replacement!

August 9th, 2009
by Christopher Kusek (PKGuild)

Alright, for those of you in the know, we all know that RichCopy isn’t anything new.  Infact it’s been being used internally at Microsoft for the past 10 years – however after a near decade of ‘Seriously?! We haven’t released this to the public?!’ it is indeed now available!   There’s a whole slew of details at others blogs RichCopy Build 4.0.216 has been posted to the Microsoft Download Center  and the TechNet Magazine article Utility Spotlight RichCopy and especially, be sure to visit the creator of this amazing tool Ken Tamaru’s blog!

So, what is this amazing tool?!  It’s free first of all! And allows you even more granular control over your copy processes, including multi-threaded copy operations!

As you can see here in this image, I’m copying a number of various sized files in different locations simultaneously!    Though one of the major perks is not in the initial copy, but instead in the situation of changed file copies (in our common “what’s changed incremental” model? :) Well, notes about that, taken verbatim from Ken’s blog show:

RichCopy 10 threads 

There must be many users who use RichCopy to copy only updated files. Most of users assign only 1 thread for directory search; however you can dramatically accelerate the performance of source and destination comparison by assigning multiple threads, especially this works well when files are distributed to multiple directories as RichCopy assign 1 thread to each directory search, not a tree.

Here is an example. (local to local, but different storage)

(1 million files in source and destination)
Thread # for Directory Search
1 about 10 minutes
2 about 6 minutes
4 about 2 minutes
8 about 1 minutes

RichCopy Options

Hands down, one of the coolest things is the level of options you can set.

The specific options I’d like to highlight are number of threads you can assign to specific operations.  That way you can increase not only the number of directories you traverse looking for files (or changed files) but also the number of files you can copy simultaneously!  This is a lifesaver when you’re copying many small files which when operating sequentially tends to take a lifetime!

 

I did run a number of speed tests on my machine, however speeds when run from my SSD tend to suffer, compared to if I were copying from say, one SAN to another SAN (something more realistic especially in a migration scenario)

 

In any sense, it’s a great tool, which operates via CLI or GUI and I’ll be sure to use or introduce it into my future migration opportunities as applicable :) Oh and be sure to click on any instance of “RichCopy” in this post in order to get a direct link to its download! :)

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Posted in Microsoft, NAS, SSD, Storage | Comments (6)

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  • Dave

    How does RichCopy compare to SecureCopy from a speed perspective? I realize free vs not free is a compelling argument :)

  • Well, I have to honestly say.. speedis relative :)
    But putting that to the side a moment, I've found there to be numerous things it is good for.

    The exceptions being – areas where you'd be using securecopy, specific around certain file permissions (typically tied to groups, etc) you'd want to continue using securecopy for that, because richcopy cannot convert local side groups to global groups, so on and so forth :)

    But the multi-threaded capabilities and control and free-ness make it something definitely worth using.

    Effectively.. if there is a scenario where you'd normally use robocopy, I'd suggest using richcopy in its place. And in the cases where you'd be using securecopy.. those are still persistent and continue using securecopy there :)

    Good to hear from you Dave! How are things treating you over at Netapp?:)

  • Dave

    Thanks, Chris. Things are well. Thanks for asking. I've done some playing with RichCopy in the past and have been impressed with its speed versus robocopy, but never really had a large enough file set to test against for speed versus SecureCopy. I'm always looking for the next tool that will allow me to complete my migrations more quickly! Hope all is well on your end and thanks again for the great info!

  • Well, I have to honestly say.. speedis relative :)nBut putting that to the side a moment, I’ve found there to be numerous things it is good for.nnThe exceptions being – areas where you’d be using securecopy, specific around certain file permissions (typically tied to groups, etc) you’d want to continue using securecopy for that, because richcopy cannot convert local side groups to global groups, so on and so forth :)nnBut the multi-threaded capabilities and control and free-ness make it something definitely worth using.nnEffectively.. if there is a scenario where you’d normally use robocopy, I’d suggest using richcopy in its place. And in the cases where you’d be using securecopy.. those are still persistent and continue using securecopy there :)nnGood to hear from you Dave! How are things treating you over at Netapp?:)n

  • Dave

    Thanks, Chris. Things are well. Thanks for asking. I’ve done some playing with RichCopy in the past and have been impressed with its speed versus robocopy, but never really had a large enough file set to test against for speed versus SecureCopy. I’m always looking for the next tool that will allow me to complete my migrations more quickly! Hope all is well on your end and thanks again for the great info!

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